Category Archives: Healthy Eating

Winning Snacks for Election Day

snack

Election Day is finally upon us. If you’re glued to your TV watching the election results roll in, you may be up late snacking. Make this election night a healthier, winning one for you by planing ahead and opting for healthier choices under 200 calories. Great options include:

  • Fresh fruit, such as sliced crunchy apples, pineapple, cantaloupe and red grapes
  • Protein-rich edamame beans, steamed, in pods
  • Homemade old fashioned stove top Popcorn – heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil for 1 minute in a tall pot and add 1/2 cup kernels. Cover the pot with a lid and within 3-5 minutes, listen to the popping! Add grated Parmesan or seasonings you like, such as garlic powder or onion powder. If butter is needed, melt one tablespoon for the entire batch. Stir and enjoy.
  • KIND bars
  • Sliced tomatoes with a drizzle of olive oil or consider grape tomatoes
  • Blend of Kashi Go Lean Crunch, almonds, and dried fruit
  • A handful of almonds, walnuts, pistachios or peanuts (the size of a jigger glass)
  • Light string cheese
  • Baby carrots dipped in hummus
  • Make your own nut mix with peanuts or walnuts and dried cranberries or golden raisins
  • Raspberries or strawberries mixed in Greek or Icelandic yogurt with a drizzle of honey

To make it easier to choose these options,  follow these tips:

  • Put healthy snacks within reach so when you are hungry, they are right there, fast and easy to grab.
  • Portion-size your snacks yourself. Remove them from a larger box or bag; choose a reasonable amount and re-baggie them. This way you can see and control how much you are eating.
  • Remember to keep hydrated with water – some of your hunger could be related to dehydration. Pour a tall glass of cool water.
  • Eat slowly. Savor each bite. Fast eating means faster calories, and these add up quickly.

Enjoy winning by not over-eating! You will sleep better, no matter the election results.

Tricky Treats: Don’t Be Tricked by Your Halloween Sweets

Halloween Candy

Mounds of Halloween sweets and delighted trick-or-treaters will fill homes this weekend. Thankfully, there are ways to get festive and in the Halloween spirit and satisfy your sweet tooth without the excessive calories and sugar overload.

Below I’ve rounded up a list of my top picks for Halloween treats and highlighted those that should be consumed in moderation – or better yet, not at all.

Top Picks

  • Lollipops: These can be a really satisfying treat as they take a long time to eat and contain no fat. Blowpops have just 70 calories.
  • Mini Candy Bars and Fun-Size Portion Packs: Smaller candy bars are lower in calories and fat than their larger counterparts (at 60 to 110 calories each). Also, fun-size pouches help you watch portion size. For example, the Fun-Size Peanut M&M packs contain 90 calories, 5 grams of fat and 9 grams of sugar. Plus, you get a bit of protein from the peanuts, too, which keeps you feeling fuller longer and makes you less inclined to reach for more.
  • Jolly Ranchers: Enjoy three Jolly Ranchers for just under 100 calories with no fat.
  • Dark Chocolate: Look for 70% cocoa when choosing your chocolate to take advantage of chocolate’s disease-fighting antioxidant. Another great option to satisfy a chocolate craving is a York Peppermint Patty (with just 60 calories and 3 grams of fat), which is lower in calories and fat than most chocolate bars. Full-size chocolate candy bars average 200-300 calories and 10-15 grams of fat.
  • Fruity Candies: At just 20 calories per piece, Starbursts make a low calorie sweet option. Jelly beans, too, are low in calorise at just 3 calories each. Twizzlers have just 30 calories per twist. Be careful, though, as a big handful and larger portions make calories in these treats add up pretty quickly.

Top Skips

  • Butterfingers: In just one bar, you’ll eat 280 calories, 10 grams of fat and 5 grams of saturated fat.
  • Mounds Chocolate Bars: Half of the fat in these chocolate bars come from fat (22 gm fat)  with 6 grams of saturated fat and 195 calories.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups: Though often a Halloween favorite, these each have 105 calories each with 50 of those calories from fat. That’s 210 calories per package of 2 pieces (45 grams in weight size) and 14.5 grams of fat.
  • Kit Kats: High in calories and fat, each regular-size bar has 7 grams of saturated fat and 22 grams of sugar. One package contains 220 calories and nearly 13 grams of fat.

Bottom line:  balance out sugary candy with real foods and real meals consumed first– and you can “trick” and treat yourself to better health, even at Halloween.

Benchmarks? Aim for no more than 150-300 calories of Halloween sweets per day and keep saturated fat at 10-15 grams for a daily maximum. For sugar, look to consume no more than 25-50 grams daily and total fat at 50-70 gm daily.  Be mindful on how each of your Halloween treats stack up.

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.   

Add Green to Your Healthy Routine this St. Patrick’s Day

Kale Smoothie

Photo courtesy of Robert Gourley

St. Patrick’s Day is almost here. Get festive and show your Irish spirit this week by adding healthy greens to your celebration.

No food coloring is necessary! Green foods are an important part of a healthy diet and are packed with nutrients you can’t easily get from other foods. Leafy greens are a great source of antioxidants and many pack plenty of vitamins A, B (including folic acid), C, K and E, as well as iron, zinc., potassium, fiber, manganese and calcium..

To keep you and your family energized and healthy, add some healthy green juices to your St. Patrick’s Day celebration. Check out these delicious green juice recipes below.

Kale & Spinach Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, celery, cucumber, lemon and apple

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 1-2 green apples
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Spicy Kale, Spinach, Apple & Carrot Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, parsley, celery, apple, carrots and cayenne

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2-3 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • 10 sprigs of parsley
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1-2 green apples
  • 2 large carrots
  • A pinch of cayenne
  • ½ -1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Kale, Cucumber, Mint & Fruit Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, cucumber, lemon, mint and pineapple juice

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 2 small handfuls fresh mint leaves
  • 1-inch thick slice fresh cored pineapple
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Kale, Spinach & Apple Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, celery, apple, cucumber, lemon, ginger and mint

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2-3 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1-2 green apples
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 1”-2” piece ginger
  • 2 small handfuls fresh mint leaves
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

To sweeten up any of these juices, try adding an extra squeeze or two of lemon or lime, honey or a bit of ginger to taste. For an extra twist and to make your juice into a smoothie, add a half-cup of Greek yogurt or your favorite milk – including skim cow’s milk, soy, almond or rice milk.

Enjoy a healthy St. Patrick’s Day!

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.             

 

 

Celebrate National Nutrition Month

Summer HarvestMarch is National Nutrition Month. It’s a time to re-assess our eating habits and re-focus our attention on nutrition. Are you living a healthy, energetic and fulfilling lifestyle? Spring forward and start today!

This year’s theme for National Nutrition Month is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle.” Here are some bite-size changes to get you started towards a healthier you.

Make Water Your Drink of Choice

What you drink is as important as what you eat. Many drinks have added sugars and little to no nutrients. Your body needs pure water to hydrate cells, so you feel healthy and energetic. Your brain alone uses two cups of water a day! Try aiming for 32 ounces of water daily, plus an additional 32 oz of water or other beverages. If you drink sugary juices or soda each day, start by replacing one of these with a glass of water and try this for a few weeks. Once you’ve made this switch, try swopping out another serving, replacing it with water. Add a slice of lemon, lime or orange to make it more flavorful. You’ll find kicking this habit is easier than you think.

Try New Foods

It’s an exciting time to explore healthy and delicious foods you might not already know. The Internet and social media have made so many great recipes available at our fingertips. Vow to try a new fruit, vegetable or whole grain each week. Pick out a different variety of apple, a different kind of leafy green, a new color of bell pepper and a new “ancient grain” (popular are amaranth, kamut and millet). And in the kitchen, you can even refresh your go-to dishes by using new cooking techniques. Try grilling instead of baking or sautéing instead of frying. Bring new life into mildly flavored foods with a pinch of different herbs and spices or the new “smoked” seasonings like smoked paprika and smoked pepper. 

Go Low on Sugar

The U.S. Nutrition Advisory Panel’s recently released recommendations for the 2015 Dietary Guidelines made one thing loud and clear – Americans need to reduce sugar intake. And that’s not just the extra spoonful of sugar you put in your coffee or cereal. It’s important to be aware of the amounts of “hidden” sugar you eat each day that are added to foods and drinks by manufacturers. The FDA and American Heart Association recommend cutting down sugar intake to less than 10 percent of your daily calories, meaning 150-200 sugar calories a day. A 12-oz soda has 150 calories of sugar alone. By limiting added sugars in drinks and sweets, avoiding excessive snacking of processed foods (typically high in added sugar) and reading food labels carefully, you can make better and more informed choices on your sugar consumption.1

Eat More Fiber

Research has found eating a fiber-rich diet can lead to reducing your risk of chronic health diseases like diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer. Studies have also shown that consuming fiber-rich foods can boost weight loss by helping you feel fuller after you eat. The reality is most Americans aren’t consuming nearly enough fiber. In fact, nutrition guidelines recommend 25 to 38 grams per day, but the average American only consumes only about 10-14 grams. Simple ways to boost your fiber intake? Try eating more fruits and vegetables (including their fiber-rich skins and peels) and add more beans, peas and lentils to your diet. Get creative and add beans to salads, soups, rice, chili, tacos, side dishes, and snacks (think edamame pods and hummus). Be sure to compare nutrition labels to discover more fiber-rich food choices to up your fiber intake.2

Connect with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN)

Registered dietitian nutritionists are experts in developing a personalized nutrition plan for you. RDNs help you translate nutritional science into ideas and tips you can use to keep you on track to a healthier life. By consulting with an RDN you can learn to “eat healthy”, dispel food and diet myths, achieve and maintain a healthy weight, feel better and reduce your lifetime risk of chronic disease that impacts your heart, cancer, muscle and bones. To find an RDN near year, go to www.scandpg.org or www.eatright.org , click on “find a dietitian”, and insert your zip code. Remember, all RDN’s are nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are RDN’s. RDN’s have met all the national educational, traineeship, and continuing education requirements by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to safely practice nutritional guidance with expert advice you can trust.

1 Source: Health.gov, 2 Source: Annals.org

For more ideas on heart-healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.

The inclusion of links to other websites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the websites or any association with their operators.                                                        

 

Step Up the Flavor of Fall Foods

Fall Healthy Eating

This time of year, there is an abundance of fall foods to enjoy that are as healthy as they are delicious. They even fall into fall colors – reds, oranges, golds and deep greens. As temperatures drop and we start to crave heartier foods, remember that fall and winter foods can be both hearty and healthy. When looking to step up the taste and nutrition of your fall and winter meals, go for color. Brighten your plate with colorful food options as these are often the foods with the most nutrients and vitamins.

Here’s a look at a variety of colored foods to enjoy this time of year and their benefits.

Reds Foods

Smart Options: pomegranate seeds, cranberries, tomato sauces, beets, red beans and lentils

These foods contain heart-healthy flavonoids, which are anti-oxidants and reduce inflammation, fighting heart disease and keeping artery walls healthy. They also contain vitamins A and C, which boost the immune system and promote healing and are good for eyes, skin, and hair.

Orange and Golden Foods

Smart Options: oranges, butternut squash, acorn squash, carrots, sweet potatoes, golden raisins

These foods contain vitamin C needed for good eye health, wound healing, strong bones and a stronger immune system.

Greens

Smart Options: broccoli, Brussel sprouts, green bell peppers, coleslaw and cabbage

These foods are rich in minerals, phytonutrients, anti-oxidants and vitamins, including vitamins A, B’s and C. These are important nutrients for overall health and well-being as well as disease prevention.

Spices of the season

Smart Options: cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cardamom, and cumin

These spices all have powerful anti-oxidant properties and fight inflammation in joints and arteries. Cinnamon also helps manage blood sugar levels. Add these enticing flavors to cooked apples, teas, beef sauces, poultry, salmon, sweet potatoes, and foods suggested below.

So get creative! Enjoy these foods and flavors in new inspiring ways. Some suggestions:

  • Pomegranate seeds sprinkled on salads and yogurt
  • Dried cranberries in oatmeal and salads
  • Roasted or pickled beets as snacks or in salads or as sides
  • Tomato sauces in stews or spaghetti or chili or soups
  • Red beans with rice or in chili, lentil soup or cold lentil salad
  • Butternut squash soup, mashed butternut squash or roasted butternut strips or rings
  • Baked, mashed or roasted sweet potatoes – a great option for both breakfast or a snack
  • Stuffed bell peppers or cabbage rolls
  • Coleslaw with diced apples, cranberries and walnuts
  • Cinnamon added to oatmeal, yogurt, stews, roasts, spaghetti sauce, butternut or acorn squash
  • Ginger added to stir-fries, broccoli, butternut squash, cranberry sauce, apples, salmon, chicken
  • Cumin added to stews, meat sauces, chili and beans

To inspire your fall and winter cooking, here are a few recipes to get you started.

Fall Recipes

Butternut Squash Soup by Georgia Kostas, MPH, RD, LD

Ingredients

Yields 6 servings

1 large butternut squash

½ large onion, chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 carrots, sliced

1 pear or apple, peeled and sliced (1 cup)

1-2 teaspoons olive oil

4 cups (2- 15oz cans) chicken broth

½ cup orange juice

½ teaspoon cinnamon

½ tsp cumin

½ teaspoon nutmeg

½ teaspoon all-spice

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground red pepper

2 Tablespoons sherry or white wine

½ bunch cilantro, chopped

Instructions

  1. Scrub butternut squash. With fork, poke several “vents” for steam to escape when cooking. Place in microwave, on paper towels. Cook on High for 10 minutes. Remove. Let sit 5 minutes, wrapped in a kitchen towel. Scoop out the flesh to add to the soup pot.
  2. While squash is cooking: sauté onion, garlic, carrots, pear in oil in a large soup pot for about 5 minutes, till softened.
  3. To soup pot, add broth and juice; heat to boil. Then add scooped butternut squash, wine, seasonings.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Add cilantro. Blenderize to create a smooth creamy texture.

Stove-top Brussels Sprouts with Cranberries and Walnuts

Ingredients

1 lb Brussels sprouts, washed, outer leaves trimmed, cut in half

1 Tbsp olive oil

1-2 cups chicken broth

¼ cup dried cranberries

¼ cup walnuts, sliced

2 tsp sugar

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Add and stir Brussels sprouts in oil 5 min; add broth a little at a time, as needed, to prevent sticking; cook till sprouts are tender, about 20 minutes.
  2. Add remaining three ingredients, stir, and cook 5 minutes more.

For more ideas on how to feel satisfied and not overeat, as well as how to enjoya healthy diet and succeed with weight loss, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/Georgia KostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.

Falling for Apples

Apples

Fresh and cooked apples, apple butter and apple pie are favorites this time of year. The good news: apples are as healthy for you as they are delicious.

An apple a day does keep the doctor away. In fact, this everyday fruit is packed full of key nutrients, including fiber, potassium, folic acid, Vitamin C, flavonoids and disease-fighting antioxidants. Research shows that the phytonutrients and antioxidants in apples may help reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases like cancer1, hypertension2, diabetes3 and heart disease4. An apple peel ingredient slows down cancer cell growth while quercetin reduces blood pressure, increases blood flow and reduces inflammation and heart disease. As an added bonus, the quercetin in apples also has antihistamine properties that may help reduce allergy symptoms4. The slow-digesting pectin fiber in apples also helps with blood sugar control and the high boron content supports strong bones and a healthy brain5.

Apples are also a good source of vitamin C. In a medium-size apple you will find about 10 percent of the daily-recommended intake of vitamin C. Vitamin C is vital to our health. It helps repair collagen and tissue, maintains bone health and provides antioxidants to lower your risk of acquiring chronic diseases.

 With less than 100 calories and 4 grams of fiber in a medium-size apple, apples make a low-calorie, healthy, crunchy and portable snack. Apples can be incorporated into many recipes and used as a healthy baking substitute, too. This fall, here are some delicious ways to enjoy apples and eat an apple a day:

  • Add sliced apples to your oatmeal at breakfast time.
  • Use chopped apples to add color and crunch to salads, coleslaw, and tuna salad.
  • When baking desserts or holiday treats, swap in applesauce as a healthier baking alternative to oils, butter and eggs. If a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of butter or oil, swap in 1/2 cup of applesauce. For eggs, swap in 1/4 cup of applesauce per egg.
  • Enjoy honey-crisp apple slices topped with peanut butter.
  • Try replacing jam or jelly on a peanut butter sandwich with apple slices dipped in orange or lemon juice to prevent browning.
  • Pair cheese with apples for a healthy snack.
  • Cook apples in a little sugar or stevia and cinnamon for a sweet treat, side dish or oatmeal topping.
  • Use apple butter in place of jam on toast as it contains no butter, just cooked apples that soften and thicken like butter.
  • Zap an apple in the microwave with cinnamon and stevia in the cored out center, as a sweet dessert.
  • Have applesauce as a snack.
  • Add apple chunks to stews, roasts, chicken or turkey dishes, spaghetti or tomato sauces, to add flavor and a natural sweetener.
  • Puree a cooked apple and add to a soup to thicken it (e.g. butternut squash soup).

You can even let apples help you with weight control. To avoid overeating, try eating an apple before a large meal. It is filling, curbs your appetite and satisfies a sweet tooth. Crunching and chewing an apple even reduces your day’s stress level.

Enjoy an apple today, sweet or tart, and add to your health!

For more ideas on how to feel satisfied and not overeat, as well as how to enjoy a healthy diet and succeed with weight loss, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/Georgia KostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.

 1 Nutrition and Cancer. http://bit.ly/1uXsRr6

2 The Journal of Nutrition. http://bit.ly/1uUGAya

3 British Medical Journal. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f5001

4 British Medical Journal. http://bit.ly/1gFBONG

5 Journal of Investigational Allergology. http://1.usa.gov/1swOyaO

6 Environmental Health Perspectives. http://1.usa.gov/1tzLbPF

 

Foods that Can Help Lower Breast Cancer Risk 

Healthy Vegetables Fight Cancer

Many people are unaware of the important role nutrition plays in fighting off breast cancer and all chronic diseases. A growing body of research highlights diet’s role in not only lowering the risk of developing breast cancer, but warding off re-occurrence, too.

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I’m sharing my top picks for cancer-fighting foods. Take a look at the following list and aim to regularly consume a wide variety of these nutrient-dense foods.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals and natural plant compounds that help fight cancer.1 Have three a day. Good sources of whole grains include:

  • Brown and wild rice
  • Oatmeal
  • Whole-wheat pasta and bread
  • Whole- wheat cereal flakes
  • Corn
  • Whole grain snacks including whole grain crackers, tortillas and bagels and popcorn. Yes, popcorn!

Fiber – Research has found that fiber helps reduce the risk of breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen in the body. In fact, a study reported in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that those who consumed the most fiber had an 11 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to women who ate the least. Aim to consume 30 grams of fiber a day. Good sources for fiber include:

  • Vegetables like romaine lettuce, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower,  broccoli and sweet potatoes
  • Pinto beans, black beans, lentils and kidney beans
  • Brown rice, oatmeal, kashi cereals, whole-wheat pasta, whole-wheat bread and tortillas

Vitamin D – Studies have revealed a strong link between vitamin D and breast cancer.3 Women with breast cancer often have low levels of vitamin D and those with higher vitamin D levels have been found less likely to develop breast cancer. Good sources of vitamin D include:

  • Fatty fish including salmon, trout, mackerel, tuna, and canned tuna
  • Vitamin D-fortified milk, orange juice and cereals
  • Egg yolk
  • Fish oils
  • Omega-3 supplements fortified with extra vitamin D

Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Research suggests omega-3s reduce inflammation which can encourage breast cancer cells to grow.4 Good sources include:

  • Chia seeds and ground flaxseed
  • Walnuts and walnut oil
  • Canola oil and soy oil
  • Edamames

Folate – Those with higher folate (a vitamin B) levels have been found to have more than a 40 percent lower risk of breast cancer than those with the lowest folate levels.5  To reach a healthy level of folate, try to consume 400 micrograms of folate each day. Good sources include:

  • Lentils
  • Kidney beans, black beans
  • Leafy greens like spinach, kale and arugula
  • Fortified cereals , breads, rice, pasta

Don’t forget that it is your total lifestyle that counts the most – your entire eating pattern of lean meats, healthy oils, whole-grains, colorful beans, fruit, and  vegetables, and low-fat dairy – combined with a healthy weight and regular exercise ( 150 minutes a week), a healthy attitude about life, and relaxation or happy events you plan daily. A  handful of healthy food choices help but nothing compares to a healthy re-vamped TOTAL style of eating and living everyday!  What is good for your whole body helps prevent cancer and energizes your life.

Sources:

  1. Health Benefits with Whole Grains. Journal of Nutrition, May 2011;141(5):1011S-22S. Epub March 30, 2011
  2. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2011. bit.ly/qKtsU2
  3. Intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of breast cancer. BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f3706. 27 June 2013.
  4. Folate, vitamin B12 and postmenopausal breast cancer in a prospective study of French women. Cancer Causes Control. Nov 2006; 17(9): 1209–1213.