Cool Treats to Beat the Heat

Smoothie

Ice-cold treats are as much a part of summer as beach days and barbecues, but some of these frozen sweets can pack on extra pounds. The good news is cool treats on a hot summer day don’t have to be unhealthy. Luckily, there is a wide range of lower fat calorie options that can satisfy your craving for a cool treat when temperatures rise.

Here are my recommendations for some homemade cool sweets and some smarter and healthier store-bought options to choose from.

Homemade Treats

Smoothie – Blend half a cup of frozen or fresh berries or fruit of choice with a half a banana, six ice cubes, and a half a cup of orange juice (or ¼ cup juice and ¼ cup of Greek yogurt).

You can even add a few spinach or kale leaves for added nutrition!

— 150 calories, no fat

Popsicles – Freeze ¼ cup of 100% juice in individual ice cube or popsicle containers

— 25 calories, no fat

Frozen Fruit – Freeze grapes or peeled banana slices on a cookie sheet; then store in freezer safe containers for sweet cold treats.

—50 calories, no fat per ½ cup

From the Store

  • Dreyers’/Edy’s Slow Churned Light/ Breyer’s Double Churn Light (100 calories; 0-3 g fat)
  • Blue Bunny frozen yogurt or fat-free, no-sugar-added ice cream (100 calories; 0-3 g fat)
  • TCBY Nonfat frozen yogurt (100 calories; 0-3 g fat)
  • Sorbet, sherbet, fruit Ice, Italian ice, water-based gelato (about 100 calories; 0-2 g fat)
  • Skinny Cow bars -Fudge , Truffle, Dipper, Fudgesicle, Popsicle, Juice (about 100 calories; 0-2 g fat)
  • Sugar-free Fudgesicle or Popsicle (15-40 calories; 0 g fat)

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas , www.georgiakostas.com; and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition.

Nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.   

 

Make This Your Mediterranean Diet Summer

Mediterranean Diet Foods

Enjoying summer’s fresh, colorful bounty of delicious foods with amazing health benefits is what living the Mediterranean lifestyle means. And this is the perfect time of year to experiment with Mediterranean foods and flavors with your own local foods.

Key components of the Mediterranean diet include:

  • Eating primarily plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts – plant foods should cover 3/4ths of your plate
  • Use herbs and spices, fresh lemon juice, garlic and onion instead of salt to flavor foods
  • Choosing lean protein-rich foods (fish, poultry, lean red meat cuts) and limiting to 3 oz portions and choosing non-fat and low-fat dairy foods
  • Replacing butter with healthy fats, such as liquid oils (olive, canola, sunflower, etc) and nuts, seeds, olives, avocado

Whether you are cooking up fresh summer squash, corn or asparagus or lightening up your next barbecue with olive oil, fresh herbs and lemon juice, the Mediterranean diet principles can be applied to any recipe or cuisine and the benefits go a long way. In fact, research has shown the Mediterranean diet drastically decreases the risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, strokes, diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity and cognition loss. Studies show deaths from these diseases can be reduced by 30 percent by following a healthy Mediterranean diet and lifestyle.1

The health and longevity benefits of the Mediterranean diet, however, are not just a result of food choices but also from overall lifestyle. The Mediterranean lifestyle encourages you to eat socially in relaxed settings and seek out fresh and locally-grown foods. There is also a big focus on adding fresh herbs, fresh vegetables, and leafy greens to your cooking to intensify flavors and provide satiety. And where sun and sea come together, quality is key – rather than quantity – with an emphasis on exercise and social connections.

This summer, make an effort to not only eat a Mediterranean diet but try to complement your eating plan and live the Mediterranean way! Start with these tips below.

  • Vow to put a focus on physical activity, enjoying relaxed meals and taking a less hurried approach to your day. Turn off the TV, phones and tablets and enjoy a meal with loved ones – engaging, laughing and talking.
  • Get up and out the door. Take a walk in the sunshine, even for 25 minutes.
  • Socialize and eat with your friends. Add a big salad with tomatoes at lunch or dinner. Add vinaigrette or oil and vinegar to your salad and eat cooked vegetables. Enjoy a 3-ounce portion of fish, poultry or lean lamb or beef at mealtime or beans as a protein entree. Try adding more whole grains to your day like whole wheat bread or brown rice or oatmeal. Top salads with nuts and/or beans.
  • Snack smart and reach for an apple or nuts. And don’t forget a little cheese and nonfat Greek yogurt, topped with fresh berries and/or nuts, make a delicious snack option, too. On of my favorites is fresh veggies dipped in hummus/Greek yogurt blended as a dip.

This is how you protect your health, your life and your zest for living.

Source: 1 New England Journal of Medicine

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.   

Healthy Summer Grilling Tips & Picks

Grilling

Photo credit woodleywonderworks

Grilling season is officially here! As you fire up the grill, consider cooking up some healthier options.

For healthier grilling, follow these tips:

  • Choose cuts wisely – Stick to healthier leaner cuts of meat. Choose chicken breasts instead of fattier thighs and wings. Look for “loin” and “round” beef and pork cuts, such as tenderloin, top loin, ground round and 90-95% lean (fat-free) ground beef. Trim off fat around pork chops for a leaner meal. Kabob meat is often lean and fat-trimmed, whether beef, lamb or pork.
  • Add fish to the menu – Try grilling salmon and trout – delicious and high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Shrimp on skewers can be brushed with cilantro, fresh lemon juice and a touch of oil for great flavor!
  • Go bold on flavor – To add more flavor to grilled meals, try adding a variety of seasonings to your marinades, such as mustard seeds, paprika, ginger, or tumeric, or add sauces like Worcestershire, chili, hot peppers, vinegars or low sodium soy sauce. Or, try a prepared marinade, such as one of McCormick’s new Grill Mate sauces. Be sure to add a splash of lemon juice or citrus to any marinade to reduce carcinogenic by-products from meat fat dripping over hot charcoal.
  • Remove fat – Trim off visible fat and skin before grilling to reduce the fat and calories in meat and poultry entrees. Consider using a grill rack so fat can drip off. After cooking, drain “shine” off any cooked meat or ground beef or poultry patty.
  • Throw veggies on the grill – Vegetables take on a whole new flavor on the grill. For the best success, lightly coat veggies with olive oil (and a little flavored vinegar) before grilling to help your seasonings stick. To prevent burning, sear your veggies over high heat and then move them over to a cooler part of the grill to finish cooking. For smaller vegetables – like delicious cherry tomatoes – use a grill basket or skewers (pre-soaked in water to not burn), as these cook fast and you want to prevent them from rolling away.
  • Ensure your grill is ready to go – A great way to ensure your grill is ready is to use the 4-second rule. If you can hold your hand 4 inches above the grill for 4 seconds your grill is good to go. If you can’t, your grill is too hot and you are likely to burn your meal. If you can hold your hand for longer than 4 seconds your grill is not hot enough, so you’ll have trouble getting that nice sear on your meat or veggies.

Here are some of my favorite grilling recipes that can be enjoyed all summer long.

Grilled Salmon and Zucchini with Red Pepper Sauce (courtesy of Eating Well Magazine)

Take your grilled salmon to the next level with a delicious red pepper sauce. This salmon sauce is made of roasted red peppers, tomatoes and almonds and works as a tasty and nutritious sauce for grilled vegetables, too. The recipe can be found here.

Easy Barbecue Salmon (via Health Magazine)

This recipe calls for combining the sweet flavor of brown sugar and savory paprika for a delicious barbecue chicken rub. It’s ready in 30 minutes and is just about 300 calories. Check out the recipe here.

Grilled Beef Steaks with Ancho Chili Rub (via Beef It’s What For Dinner)

Choose a lean cut of beef and kick up the flavor with a tangy rub. This recipe combines chili powder, oregano, cinnamon, orange peel and cocoa powder. You can find the recipe here.

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.   

The inclusion of links to other websites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the websites or any association with their operators.   

Healthy Eating On-the- Go

When eating on the go, it’s easy to opt for quick, high-calorie, unhealthy fixes but healthy meals and snacks are key to feeling energized, satisfied and generally better about your overall health. All it takes is planning ahead to have healthy, tasty, grab-and-go choices on-hand. You can buy or prepare these ahead of time.

Here are some healthy “real food” ideas to keep within reach in your car, at the office or at home. 

7 Eleven Fresh To Go

Shop Smart

Great news – a new wide range of healthful individually-packaged food options are available at convenience stores and grocery stores, as more and more shoppers seek out fresh, healthy choices. Know where to go and what to look for. 7-Eleven recently launched a wide range of better-for-you snack and meal options, including sandwiches and salads under 400 calories. Some of my favorites: tuna salad and turkey sandwiches, Chicken Caesar and Thai salads (light dressings are available), hummus and pita chips, fruit cups, mixed nuts, yogurt parfait with fresh fruit and granola topping, carrot and celery sticks with Ranch dip, individually wrapped string cheese and cheese rounds and hard-boiled eggs.

Almonds and raisins snack

Think Ahead, Prep Ahead

Set aside a half hour each week to make your own portable snack packs to grab when heading out the door each day. Combine a variety of foods that go well together and put them in small baggies. Try raw almonds mixed with golden raisins. Mix up different kinds of nuts like pistachios, walnuts, and peanuts (3-4 tablespoons per baggie); mix in dried fruit like dried cranberries, cherries and strawberries. Add a few fiber-rich brown rice crackers to pair with Cabot Cheese individual slices. Package grape tomatoes or baby carrots or cucumber slices. Have 6 oz. nonfat Greek yogurts on hand, and individual cottage cheese containers that can be topped with nuts.

Go Portable

Stock up on portable snacks that are perfectly sized to stash in your purse, desk drawer or office fridge. Wonderful options include raisins, popcorn, carrots and celery sticks with a low-fat Ranch dressing or hummus, soy nuts, string cheese, fruit, pistachios, almonds, cereal, trail mix, instant oatmeal packets individual 1-tablespoon almond or peanut butter or avocado packets with whole-wheat crackers or pita chips.

Fruit kabobs

Photo courtesy of Bethany King

Don’t Get Bored – Get Creative

Take your snacks to the next level. Don’t just stick to the same foods — if you tire of these, you may find yourself reaching for salty and sugary options. Instead, come up with new ideas and swap in foods that excite you. You’ll be more inclined to snack on these throughout the day. Some fun, tasty, creative and healthy ideas:

  • A handful of dried plums, edamame beans or brown rice crackers
  • Salad on a stick – skewer grape tomatoes, cucumber slices and feta cubes
  • Fruit on a stick – skewer 2 strawberries, 2 pineapple chunks, melon chunks and grapes
  • Your favorite fruit cut in half (try apples or other fruits in season) topped with a tablespoon of nut- butter and a sprinkle of ginger
  • Vitamin-rich mandarin oranges (try Cuties or Halos)
  • Celery sticks wrapped in slices of your favorite low-fat, low-sodium deli meat (try turkey breast or ham) and dipped in one teaspoon of whole grain mustard

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com

Add Green to Your Healthy Routine this St. Patrick’s Day

Kale Smoothie

Photo courtesy of Robert Gourley

St. Patrick’s Day is almost here. Get festive and show your Irish spirit this week by adding healthy greens to your celebration.

No food coloring is necessary! Green foods are an important part of a healthy diet and are packed with nutrients you can’t easily get from other foods. Leafy greens are a great source of antioxidants and many pack plenty of vitamins A, B (including folic acid), C, K and E, as well as iron, zinc., potassium, fiber, manganese and calcium..

To keep you and your family energized and healthy, add some healthy green juices to your St. Patrick’s Day celebration. Check out these delicious green juice recipes below.

Kale & Spinach Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, celery, cucumber, lemon and apple

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 1-2 green apples
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Spicy Kale, Spinach, Apple & Carrot Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, parsley, celery, apple, carrots and cayenne

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2-3 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • 10 sprigs of parsley
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1-2 green apples
  • 2 large carrots
  • A pinch of cayenne
  • ½ -1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Kale, Cucumber, Mint & Fruit Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, cucumber, lemon, mint and pineapple juice

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 2 small handfuls fresh mint leaves
  • 1-inch thick slice fresh cored pineapple
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

Kale, Spinach & Apple Juice

In a blender or food processor, blend kale, spinach, celery, apple, cucumber, lemon, ginger and mint

  • 6-8 kale leaves
  • 2-3 handfuls of spinach leaves
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1-2 green apples
  • ½ cucumber
  • ½ lemon (remove peel)
  • 1”-2” piece ginger
  • 2 small handfuls fresh mint leaves
  • ½-1 cup water and/or juice (pineapple or apple)
  • Handful of ice cubes

To sweeten up any of these juices, try adding an extra squeeze or two of lemon or lime, honey or a bit of ginger to taste. For an extra twist and to make your juice into a smoothie, add a half-cup of Greek yogurt or your favorite milk – including skim cow’s milk, soy, almond or rice milk.

Enjoy a healthy St. Patrick’s Day!

For more ideas on healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.             

 

 

Celebrate National Nutrition Month

Summer HarvestMarch is National Nutrition Month. It’s a time to re-assess our eating habits and re-focus our attention on nutrition. Are you living a healthy, energetic and fulfilling lifestyle? Spring forward and start today!

This year’s theme for National Nutrition Month is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle.” Here are some bite-size changes to get you started towards a healthier you.

Make Water Your Drink of Choice

What you drink is as important as what you eat. Many drinks have added sugars and little to no nutrients. Your body needs pure water to hydrate cells, so you feel healthy and energetic. Your brain alone uses two cups of water a day! Try aiming for 32 ounces of water daily, plus an additional 32 oz of water or other beverages. If you drink sugary juices or soda each day, start by replacing one of these with a glass of water and try this for a few weeks. Once you’ve made this switch, try swopping out another serving, replacing it with water. Add a slice of lemon, lime or orange to make it more flavorful. You’ll find kicking this habit is easier than you think.

Try New Foods

It’s an exciting time to explore healthy and delicious foods you might not already know. The Internet and social media have made so many great recipes available at our fingertips. Vow to try a new fruit, vegetable or whole grain each week. Pick out a different variety of apple, a different kind of leafy green, a new color of bell pepper and a new “ancient grain” (popular are amaranth, kamut and millet). And in the kitchen, you can even refresh your go-to dishes by using new cooking techniques. Try grilling instead of baking or sautéing instead of frying. Bring new life into mildly flavored foods with a pinch of different herbs and spices or the new “smoked” seasonings like smoked paprika and smoked pepper. 

Go Low on Sugar

The U.S. Nutrition Advisory Panel’s recently released recommendations for the 2015 Dietary Guidelines made one thing loud and clear – Americans need to reduce sugar intake. And that’s not just the extra spoonful of sugar you put in your coffee or cereal. It’s important to be aware of the amounts of “hidden” sugar you eat each day that are added to foods and drinks by manufacturers. The FDA and American Heart Association recommend cutting down sugar intake to less than 10 percent of your daily calories, meaning 150-200 sugar calories a day. A 12-oz soda has 150 calories of sugar alone. By limiting added sugars in drinks and sweets, avoiding excessive snacking of processed foods (typically high in added sugar) and reading food labels carefully, you can make better and more informed choices on your sugar consumption.1

Eat More Fiber

Research has found eating a fiber-rich diet can lead to reducing your risk of chronic health diseases like diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer. Studies have also shown that consuming fiber-rich foods can boost weight loss by helping you feel fuller after you eat. The reality is most Americans aren’t consuming nearly enough fiber. In fact, nutrition guidelines recommend 25 to 38 grams per day, but the average American only consumes only about 10-14 grams. Simple ways to boost your fiber intake? Try eating more fruits and vegetables (including their fiber-rich skins and peels) and add more beans, peas and lentils to your diet. Get creative and add beans to salads, soups, rice, chili, tacos, side dishes, and snacks (think edamame pods and hummus). Be sure to compare nutrition labels to discover more fiber-rich food choices to up your fiber intake.2

Connect with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN)

Registered dietitian nutritionists are experts in developing a personalized nutrition plan for you. RDNs help you translate nutritional science into ideas and tips you can use to keep you on track to a healthier life. By consulting with an RDN you can learn to “eat healthy”, dispel food and diet myths, achieve and maintain a healthy weight, feel better and reduce your lifetime risk of chronic disease that impacts your heart, cancer, muscle and bones. To find an RDN near year, go to www.scandpg.org or www.eatright.org , click on “find a dietitian”, and insert your zip code. Remember, all RDN’s are nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are RDN’s. RDN’s have met all the national educational, traineeship, and continuing education requirements by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to safely practice nutritional guidance with expert advice you can trust.

1 Source: Health.gov, 2 Source: Annals.org

For more ideas on heart-healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.

The inclusion of links to other websites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the websites or any association with their operators.                                                        

 

Silent Signs of Heart Disease in Women

Women Heart Health Tips

Most people don’t realize that heart disease and stroke are the #1 killer of women. Many have the misconception that heart disease is a man’s disease, but the reality is that each year one in every three women will die of heart disease and stroke.

In honor of National Heart Month and GO RED for Women month, I am joining the movement to help women know the facts and that they can prevent heart disease. In fact, 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes.1

Get to Know the Facts

  • One of 3 women dies from heart disease, equal to the prevalence in men.
  • More women than men die from heart attacks and strokes.
  • Women typically develop cardiovascular symptoms about a decade later than men, and the disease is often riskier and more complicated to treat. Women are also more likely to be disabled after a heart attack or stroke.
  • At menopause, a woman’s heart diseaserisk starts to increase significantly, so start prevention before menopause.
  • 90 percent of women have at least one risk factor for developing heart disease.
  • Women’s symptoms are often overlooked at emergency rooms, or doctors’ offices. That is why it is CRUCIAL for you to be in the know and to be pro-active if symptoms are present.
  • Women don’t have “typical” symptoms and symptoms do not always include chest pain. Commonly, the only symptom is extreme fatigue, or fatigue upon exertion or “just not feeling right.” You can see why this symptom is misdiagnosed. Fatigue can result from lack of sleep, lifestyle, allergies, colds, and many other conditions, but at times it is a sign of heart disease.

Recognize the Symptoms

Heart Attack

  • unexplained prolonged fatigue
  • chest discomfort , pressure or chest pain (not as severe as men’s)
  • pain in your arm(s), back, neck, or jaw or stomach pain
  • shortness of breath, with or without exertion
  • light-headedness or headache
  • confusion
  • nausea or indigestion
  • sweating

Stroke

F.A.S.T. is an acronym used for the most common signs and symptoms of stroke. These signs tend to appear suddenly and every second matters so it’s crucial to act fast.

  • Face. Ask the person to smile. Does the face look uneven? Does one side droop?
  • Arms. Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift down or is it unable to move?
  • Speech. Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Does their speech sound strange? Strange speech could be slurred, the wrong words may come out, or the person is unable to speak.
  • Time to call 9-1-1.

Understand the Risk Factors

Be alert to your risk status for heart disease. Each risk factor increases your risk. These include:

  • Age 55 or older – no matter how healthy you are
  • Smoking, which increases heart risk 7 times more in women than in men
  • Diabetes, which increases risk by 3-fold
  • Being overweight or having abdominal fat (a waist size over 35 inches)
  • African-American women over age 20 – almost 50% have heart disease
  • Hispanic women – who typically get heart disease 10 years earlier than Caucasian women
  • High blood pressure – 1 in 3 women over age 65 have or will have HBP
  • Cholesterol over 200 – which means 70% of women
  • High triglycerides (blood fats) over 125
  • Sedentary living, including more than 10 hrs of TV a week
  • Menopause – at any age
  • Depression/stress (ups risk 2.5 times)
  • Inadequate sleep
  • Family history or personal history of a heart condition

Scary, isn’t it? How many risk factors do you have? Which can you reverse or control?

Here’s the good news: 80 percent of all heart disease is preventable and even reversible by making lifestyle changes in your eating and activity habits.  

We can all make changes. Be proactive! Do not wait for your doctor to tell you to eat fresh food or shed a few pounds. Rid your pantry of packaged foods with extra salt, sugar and saturated and trans fats. Vow to eat a heart-healthy diet that is plant-focused with lean proteins and liquid vegetable oils. Add salads, beans, nuts, fruit and wholegrains to your daily diet along with lean cuts of beef and pork and nonfat dairy foods. You can do this. Take a 30 minute brisk walk daily in your neighborhood, mall or gym. You can break it up into three 10-minute walks. It all starts with one step.

Making these changes, you will soon reap the benefits – improved, less inflamed arteries, better blood flow, lower blood fats and a lessened risk for heart attacks and stroke. The sooner you start, the better. The longer the damage continues, the tougher for you to turn around. Please take preventative, aggressive action. Every bite and every step count.

Start eating better and move more today. You are worth it!

For more ideas on heart-healthy eating and successful solutions, check out The Cooper Clinic Solution to the Diet Revolution: Step Up to the Plate (2009). My guidebook of tips and eating plans makes healthy eating more enjoyable and more manageable. Connect with me online at @GeorgiaKostas and Facebook/GeorgiaKostasNutrition and visit: http://www.georgiakostas.com.

This nutrition information does not address individual health conditions. Please consult with your physician or registered dietitian to meet specific health and dietary needs.

The inclusion of links to other websites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the websites or any association with their operators.                                                        

1Source: The American Heart Association